Behn conveys both comedy and cruelty through the character of blunt essay

Is The Rover Different?

Behn conveys both comedy and cruelty through the character of blunt essay

How to Write a Summary of an Article? As women stepped on stage, they entered a market- they were commodities displayed to attract a larger crowd towards the theatre. The hymen itself was a commodity, as a woman could only marry if she was a virgin. Thus, arguably, a woman could not escape being a prostitute in the Restoration Period.

As a woman author who thus reflected the trend of women actors entering the world of theatrical production, Aphra Behn was continually negotiating the dichotomy of economic freedom and control of women in this market-space.

Thus her work would be the ideal case study to understand the gender economics of the Restoration Period. There was a new kind of apparent sexual freedom.

He introduced the practice of actresses playing female roles. However, actresses earned far less than actors, thus had to resort to being mistresses.

Also, publishing by the women was tantamount to prostitution. They needed money but had no inclination to actually earn it and preferred procuring it through marriage to an heiress.

As in the typical Restoration comedy, men seek sex and money, the girls want a say in the choice of a marriage partner. Thus evidently the heroine is allowed freedom of thought but her freedom of action is confined to ensuring that she is a virgin when she gets married to the man of her choice.

As a successful professional playwright, Aphra Behn definitely wrote plays which are typical of the Restoration, yet she manages to comment on a topic which touched her very closely: As for the author of this coming play I asked him what he thought fit I should say pp 4 It was only in the third issue of the first edition in that Aphra Behn authorship.

This was because she was always attacked for poaching on the territory of male playwrights. The Dial Press, Aphra Behn once famously said: The Woman damns the poet Indeed, the fact that Aphra Behn could earn a living writing for the theatre was precisely what condemned her.

The muckraking satirist Robert Gould wrote ypical stander in a short piece addressed to Behn that concluded with this couplet: In her case, however, the status of professional writer indicated immodesty: Thus in economic terms, women through marriage had evident exchange value; that is, the virgin became a commodity not only as breeder of the legal heir but for her portion.

Women in the seventeenth-century marriage market took on the phantasmagoric destiny of commodities: The issue arises repeatedly in plays and verse of the period: Also the cultural narrative of portion, jointure, and legal dependency in which the women of this time is written about is clearly not as subject but as object of exchange.

Also, as discussed earlier, when Aphra Behn wrote her seventeen playthe theatrical hierarchy, like all cultural institutions, was patriarchal in control and participation.

Also, in its machinery and properties, the Restoration stage was now arguably more dreamlike, seductive, and commodity intensive. Here the idea of a fetish becomes important.

This idea is relevant because on the stage, the Restoration actress, is nothing but an ornament in the male gaze. This attitude is apparent as Thomas Shadwell links the new phenomenon of female performers with painted theatrical scenes, both innovative commodities for audience consumption: Had we not for yr pleasure found new wayes You still had rusty Arras had, and thredbare playes: In her professional duplicity, in her desirability, in her often public status of kept mistress, she is frequently equated with a prostitute, thus acquiring the definite status of a commodity.

In her wholly original The Feigned Curtezansvirgins impersonate famous Roman courtesans and near-debauches occur, but marriages settle the confusion of plots and the financial stink of prostitution is hastily cleared away.

Beginning appropriately enough with The Forced Marriage: Aphra Behn concentrated on exposing the exploitation of women in the exchange economy, adding vividly to contemporary discourse on the oppressions of marriage.The free Shakespeare research paper (Twelfth Night Comedy essay) presented on this page should not be viewed as a sample of our on-line writing service.

Behn conveys both comedy and cruelty through the character of blunt essay

If you need fresh and competent research / writing on Shakespeare, use the professional writing service offered by our company. sing the Plays “Much Ado About Nothing” and “the Rover” Essay Sample.

The Renaissance comedy, ‘Much Ado About Nothing’, written by Shakespeare in during the Elizabethan era, addresses male inconstancy and female persecution; how women are controlled by the prevailing patriarchal system. Hero, the conventional heroine, is a ‘shrinking violet’, who suffers character assassination through .

sing the Plays “Much Ado About Nothing” and “the Rover” Essay Sample. The Renaissance comedy, ‘Much Ado About Nothing’, written by Shakespeare in during the Elizabethan era, addresses male inconstancy and female persecution; how women are controlled by the prevailing patriarchal system.

Hero, the conventional heroine, is a ‘shrinking violet’, who suffers character assassination through . This attitude is contradictory to the custom of a happy ending in Restoration Comedy in which all characters are happy and all problems are solved.

Like Blunt of The Rover, Sir Fopling Flutter has not undergone the conventional development to become a better man. in her essay, Behn, woman, and society, states that in Aphra Behn’s time.

Behn’s substitution works not only to establish links between her rake-hero and the buffoon Blunt, but also to expose the phallocentric heart of the libertine hero who throughout the play professes to advocate sexual freedom for both sexes. Behn conveys both comedy and cruelty through the character of blunt “Behn conveys both comedy and cruelty through the character of blunt” explore bens presentation of the “Essex calf” in .

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