Korean culture and traditions

May 16, by Rajib Mukherjee Traditions have always been perceived as knowledge, believes and customs that have been handed down from one generation to the next from time immemorial. Some traditions have been refined, thanks to progressive minded individuals who have filtered believes of their ancestors and re-established old virtues in a new light. As an example, the European Intellectual movement of the 17th and the 18th centuries also known as enlightenment which brought about a shift in the thinking of educated men, from traditional and established practices to more reason based conclusions, can be cited here. Some traditions, on the other hand, have been kept alive in the truest of forms for thousands of years.

Korean culture and traditions

Chris Tharp Dec 9, Korean culture has survived for 5, years, despite the best efforts by hostile neighbors to stomp it out. If you know and respect Korean culture you will get much more out of your time in Korea.

Kimchi is culture Kimchi. Nagyman Kimchi is sliced cabbage, fermented with red chili sauce and anchovy paste.

Cultural life

It is pungent, spicy, and sour. Koreans love it and eat it with every meal — usually on the side -— though they also use it as an ingredient in countless other dishes. Kimchi is symbolic of Korean culture: To do any less is a sign of great disrespect. Koreans have a special relationship with their floor, on which they sit and often sleep.

A dirty floor is intolerable in a Korean home, and they view Westerners as backward savages for remaining shod in our living rooms. Eugene Kim Korea is a drinking culture, and their national booze is soju, a clear, vodka-like drink.

Koreans drink in boisterous groups, regularly clinking glasses, while shouting geonbae! At night, you will see men coming out of norae bang karaoke rooms and staggering through the streets, laughing, singing and arguing.

South Korea - Language, Culture, Customs and Etiquette

Just be sure to avoid the puddles of reddish-vomit often left behind, which are also known as kimchi flowers. Koreans have strict drinking etiquette: Mohamed Yahya Like the Japanese, the Koreans eat rice with almost every meal.

Also, chopsticks must never be left sticking out of the rice bowl, as this resembles the way rice is offered to the dead. Do not smile Photo: Sometimes, the chaotic streets of the peninsula resemble a sea of scowls, with everyone literally putting their most stern faces forward.

Beware of elbows Photo: Craig Nagy Korea is a crowded country. The result is a lot of people in small spaces, and folks will not think twice about pushing and jostling in order to get onto a bus, into an elevator, or to those perfect onions at the market.

Dissent is alive and well. Koreans protest with frequency and they protest with fervor —- on all sides of the political spectrum.

Korean culture and traditions

Protesters employ a variety of methods, from the violent angry students regularly attack riot police with huge metal rodsto the absurd cutting off fingers, throwing animal dung, covering themselves in bees.

Hiking As Korea is mountainous, it should come as no surprise that hiking is the national pastime. Even the most crowded of cities have mountains that offer a relative haven from the kinetic madness of the streets below.

Koreans are at their best on the mountain.

10 Korean customs you need to know before you visit Korea

They smile and greet you and will often insist on sharing their food and drink. Make sure to stop at a mountain hut restaurant for pajeon fritter and dong dong ju rice wine. Republic of Korea Koreans are an extremely proud people, and sometimes this pride transforms into white-hot nationalism. You see this nationalism displayed at sporting events, where thousands of Korean fans cheer their national teams on in unison, banging on drums and waving massive flags.

Finally, please remember the two following things: To a Korean, there is no such thing as The Sea of Japan. The body of water between Korea and Japan is known only as the East Sea.

Alternative Names

Also, Koreans fervently believe that Dokdo — the disputed islets between Korea and Japan known in Japan as Takeshima -— belong only to Korea.May 16,  · Traditionally, Korean culture requires of their men to eat first before the females.

There are various other details and twists to this but in the modern Korean society this is not strictly followed. However, what is followed is that the eldest of the family is the first to alphabetnyc.com: Rajib Mukherjee. Korean culture has survived for 5, years, despite the best efforts by hostile neighbors to stomp it out.

If you know and respect Korean culture you will get much more out of your time in Korea.

Kimchi is sliced cabbage, fermented with red chili sauce and anchovy paste. It is pungent, spicy, and. Although the Korean state is divided into two different countries, traditional culture and customs are shared by both the countries.

Music, dance, painting, literature and crafts are . The contemporary culture of South Korea developed from the traditional culture of Korea which was prevalent in the early Korean nomadic tribes.

By maintaining thousands of years of ancient Korean with influence from ancient Chinese culture South Korea split on its own path of cultural development away from North Korean culture since the division of Korea in Korean culture has survived for 5, years, despite the best efforts by hostile neighbors to stomp it out.

If you know and respect Korean culture you will get much more out of your time in Korea. Kimchi is sliced cabbage, fermented with red chili sauce and anchovy paste. It is pungent, spicy, and. However, having said that, Korean traditions both north and south of the border, have many similarities.

Chinese and Japanese Influence Over Korean Culture Korea has been influenced by both Japanese and Chinese cultures.

Culture of South Korea - Wikipedia